Lavender Ice Cream

Lavender Ice Cream

Divine Lavender Ice Cream

One of my most favourite things in Summer is an afternoon at home, the TV or radio is tuned into Wimbledon and hearing the cheers and whack of racket on rubber, whilst pottering around the house and tending to the garden.  On these days a serving of cool, relaxing Lavender ice cream always goes down well with the whole family.

Aside from Strawberries and Cream and maybe a jug or 3 of Pimms, nothing says quintessentially English countryside like all of these amazing flavours in one bowl.

Whilst on a quick family break one May half term to North Norfolk we came across Norfolk Lavender. A lovely place to visit where there are lots of lovely gardens to explore, a great play area, shops and restaurant. While we were there we indulged in their lavender ice cream. I was hooked.  I purchased three lavender plants, brought them home, planted them and a couple of years later had an abundance of flowers to make my own lavender ice cream find my recipe below.  It’s so simple and you probably have most of the ingredients in your store cupboard/garden already.

Recipe

Alexas_Fotos / Pixabay

 Ingredients

20 lavender heads (approx)
2 tins Evaporated milk
1/2 cup caster sugar
1/4 teaspoon vanilla essence / extract.
4 egg yolks

Time

approx 30mins prep

2hours cooling time.

                         30mins in ice cream maker

Method

  1. First your going to need to empty those tins in a large nonstick pan and add the sugar.  Bring to a gentle simmer to dissolve all sugar, then take off the heat and set aside.
  2. Next get those lavender flowers.  Now if they’re not dried flowers, but fresh from the garden (this is what I prefer) then you’re going to need to give them a good tapping on the worktop to get any bugs out!  Once you are satisfied all livestock is removed then gently run under cool water.
  3. Shake off excess water, maybe dab with paper towel.  Then go ahead and place the picked off heads into your milk and sugar mixture, stir and allow to steep in the warm mixture.  (Now I’m too impatient, so I tend to get brutal with some kind of implement to hammer out as much flavour as possible, usually a veg masher or rolling pin end.)
  4. Go ahead, give it a taste, happy? When you are happy with the flavour, strain the mixture, squeezing through the last remaining juices with the back of a spoon.
  5. Next take your well beaten egg yolks and gradually mix into the cream mixture while stirring constantly over a low heat so as not to scamble the eggs. Add the vanilla at this point.
  6. Once all the egg yolks have been combined you can crank the heat up a smidgen but keep stir constantly until you have a lovely smooth thick custard. Set to one side and allow to cool completely.
  7. Finally you are ready to pour into your ice cream maker and continue as per the manufacturers instructions. Enjoy…

Notes:

i) actual cream can be used instead of evaporated milk, I’ve not tried this… let me know if you do what it turns out like.

ii) honey can be used in place of sugar, again not something I’ve tried, but it would be awesome to try if it was honey made from lavender nectar!

iii) dried flowers can be used instead of fresh, I have done this and my preference is fresh flowers.

The machine I use is the Magimix 1.5 model.  I keep the bowl permanently in the freezer so it’s always ready when I have the urge to make a stash of ice cream. It also doubles as a brilliant wine bottle cooler!

It’s currently on sale with Amazon with 18% off and with free prime delivery too.  Checked 2nd August 2017.  Snap it up will stocks last, follow the link below for the offer.

I also highly recommend the following book by Marilyn and Tanya Linton, it’s a great place to start.

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